Poll: Freezer Sensor Price

NOTE: This will be a ZigBee sensor.

Hey all – we have a unique opportunity to offer a sensor that can be placed in a freezer (fully enclosed, no probes) that monitors temperature. The purpose of this would be to monitor the temperature of your freezer and/or alert you if your freezer is not working properly.

More to come here, but we wanted to see what everyone would pay for something like this as we have the wholesale price, but in order to meet our minimum margins, we have to charge a certain MSRP.

So, the question is: How much would you pay for something like this?

Currently this sensor has been deployed in one of the largest grocery stores in the US to monitor their freezer section.

Any questions/clarifications, please comment below!

Please select one option below. Also, obviously as a customer, we want the lowest cost possible, but please answer this as the max amount you’d spend on something like this. If the results are too low, we will have to evaluate the option.

  • $20-25
  • $25-30
  • $30-35
  • $35-40
  • $40-45
  • $45-50
  • $50+

0 voters

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How far does the signal travel given a freezer is a big metal box? Will it have a 500 or 700 series chip? S2 authentication?

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Great question – so this one would be ZigBee and apparently it runs on 2.4GHz so it’s strong enough to penetrate metal boxes.

If it’s restaurant grade (ie: walk-in cooler), it may require a probe.

@Eric_Inovelli Very interesting. I expected this to be z-wave since all your other products are z-wave. You should probably include that in the summary. I currently do not have any ZigBee devices. Granted ST supports both but I’m thinking about switching to HA and I would be to buy a different USB controller that does both protocols.

Great point – apologies, I’ll add that in.

We will be adding in ZigBee switches to the mix in 2021 (basically we’ll be producing Z-Wave and ZigBee to hit both markets – enthusiasts for Z-Wave, and mass-market for ZigBee/CHIP).

4 Likes

How will these be powered? Many batteries dislike being cold. I’d be concerned about battery reliability at -10F.

3 Likes

I have really been wanting something like this for the freezers (inside and garage) and may also put one in the refrigerator in the garage. My biggest concern was battery life in cold environments and it sounds like this wont be an issue based on its current use.

Excellent idea.

So this will be a temperature ONLY sensor? No ability to detect whether the freezer door was left open or not?

Just asking because you will be competing against a device that already does both in my book:
https://www.amazon.com/Visonic-MCT-340-Wireless-Window-Temperature/dp/B06XDJ3KYC

While not rated for freezer use, I have had these in freezers and fridges for some time. They just need a repeater fairly nearby due to the metal usually. Those sold for ~$20.

I think this is one of those “why can’t I find one for my home” devices. I see a lot of people throw in other sensors in their freezers but they aren’t really made for that. This would be great and I would easily purchase more than one.

If you ever get an opportunity for a zwave/zigbee pool temperature sensor let us know. :slight_smile:

I think I rather see a flood sensor over a freezer sensor. At first I was excited, because I’m a little slow, I thought this was going to be an outdoor rated 4-N-1 sensor. Then I kept reading.

This seems more industrial/commercial than residential. I’m generally not too concerned about freezer being left open. Some folks have them in their garage and the gfci can trip causing a horrendous smell after a week. But that would be a rare occasion for me to want to implement a freezer sensor. For that reason, I’m out.

3 Likes

They are battery powered where the battery will be guaranteed to last 5yrs (I believe). Right now the ones being used have been in freezers for 8yrs and still running.

Idk how they did it tbh bc I had the same thought as you. Must have some good insulation!

The downside is the battery cannot be replaced.

Great question - I’ll ask, but I believe it is just temp only!

Yes! I’ve been wanting to make a pool sensor. It’s been a top request for a while now.

Well hopefully Robert will take our money then Mr. Wonderful!

2 Likes

“The downside is the battery cannot be replaced.”

Ugh, sorry I’m out. I love supporting you guys but non-replaceable batteries are a deal breaker.

6 Likes

If there is a battery it is always possible if you are ok with the work to do it.

Ooof, I was expecting/hoping it to be Z-wave like the rest of your offerings. :frowning: I’m trying to avoid the 2.4GHz spectrum because it’s already so overloaded and crowded, and Z-wave’s 900MHz penetrates obstacles better (like big metal boxes). Keep me posted if y’all build a Z-wave variant!

3 Likes

“Physics” :slight_smile:

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I’m sorry, but you’re barking up the wrong tree with this product idea. Zigbee sensors are a fully mature market with the cost efficiencies already mature. I get the Aqara sensors for about $12 a piece nowadays. Battery life is fantastic and replaceable. I’ve got several of these interrogated into my HomeSeer platform, and yes, in my fridge and freezer.

I would love a sensor specifically made for the freezer’s but even with a 5 year battery life they would need to be $30 or under for me to bite.

I put in a new LG LMXS30776S refrigerator about 3 years ago and it already has had major issues. This was not a cheap refrigerator and wile warranty did cover it we had it repaired 3 times. I did put a sensor in it but did not have it set up for notifications during to repairs that were spread out over a couple months. It would would go out at night and if I reset the power it would work for a couple days. I would have paid up to maybe $125 if I could have been notified on my google hub the the freezer was not working with a early notification. So working with Google or a text message would be a must.

In fact I would still be happy to buy (x2) right now for something in the future.

To me the whole purpose of Zigbee is that it’s currently way cheaper than Z-Wave since the licensing was traditionally much more permissive. Hopefully that changes next year with Silicon Labs having opened up their licensing, but for a Zigbee device with no replaceable battery I can’t see spending more than $25.

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Just for that reason I’m not interested. I’m already using a tool like that for 2 freezers but at leats I can change the battery. Was cheap on Amazon but can’t use it with Hubutat :frowning:

1 Like